All posts by Analyzing Trends

The Tale of the Nauga’s Hide

The Nauga is a fictional creature. It was an advertising gimmick created to help Uniroyal Engineered Products promote their soft vinyl-coated fabric that feels like leather but is more durable.  The product, Naugahyde, was used primarily as upholstery in the furniture industry, but also was used for clothing, shoes, accessories and other home goods. Its success spawned many imitators.  In the mid-1960s, Uniroyal hired legendary ad-man George Lois and designer Kurt Weihs to craft an advertising campaign to differentiate their product from the competition. And what did Lois and Weihs create? The Nauga. Read more (Henry Ford Museum)

COLGATE IS A COOL MOM WITH IRIDESCENT NEW TOOTHPASTE LINE FOR GEN Z

Classic toothpaste brand Colgate is one of these companies. This week, the brand launched CO. by Colgate, a new oral care collection aimed at Gen Z. Using the empowering, self-care language that has come to dominate beauty marketing, the new collection is described as one that “transforms the simple act of brushing your teeth into a ritual for feeling good”. Read more Read more (Dazed)

How Ikea created a ‘ScrapsBook’ that turns kitchen waste into culinary wonders

“By inspiring our customers to live more sustainably at home in an easy and simple way, we’re doing our part as a business to have a positive impact, from our supply chain through our retail stores, and into our customers’ homes,” explains Johanna Andren, head of marketing for IKEA Canada. Read more (Drum)

Marijuana and Makeup Are New Growth Areas for Vertical Farms

South Korean startup Farm 8 Co. is among a proliferation of indoor urban growers that saw sales jump during Covid-19. It’s looking to increase sales by almost 50% to 90 billion won ($79 million) this year, partly by boosting production of medical and cosmetic-based plants such as ginseng, centella asiatica and artemisia campestris, Chief Executive Officer Kang Dae Hyun said. In August, the company joined the country’s first regulation-free zone for medical cannabis, growing and processing hemp for cannabidiol (CBD). Read more (Bloomberg)

What is the dining table really for?

Dinner happens everywhere now: on the couch while streaming a television show, hunched over a kitchen countertop, on a commute home. The shift happened right under our noses — in a 2019 survey about cooking at home, while 72 percent of respondents grew up eating at a dining room table, only 48 percent of them still do so now. The American dining room is dying a slow death, and we’ve barely batted an eye. For the sake of convenience, we don’t sit down for capital-D dinner anymore. What has this fade into obsolescence done to the dining table, and to the people who once gathered around it to share a meal? The dining table hasn’t disappeared — there are plenty next to my family’s on Facebook Marketplace — but its meaning seems to have been altered forever. Read more (Vox)

Cannabis will drive a reboot of agriculture innovation in the USA

Agriculture is a large and major industry in the US. About 40 percent of the US land is for agriculture, as over 2.2 million farms are covering about 922 million acres of land. But, what is the future of agriculture in the US? The US agriculture is setting its edge on improvement. This upgrade in the agricultural sector has caused some changes, fulfilling the US economy’s needs. The US economy needs sustainable agriculture, bringing about the cause for changes in the agricultural sector. This article gives details about these changes, keep reading to know more.  Read more

Japan Inc. should use COVID-19 to end excessive formality

Extreme formality runs deep in Japanese business culture, stifling employees’ sense of ownership and suppressing innovation. Unexpectedly, the COVID-19 pandemic offers a chance to disrupt such staid traditions.  Excessive formality hurts companies in three ways. First, it discourages young minds from voicing their opinions. With the business environment shifting so quickly, and the maturity curve of wisdom being flattened — if not reversed — businesses only suffer by being deaf to younger voices. Read more (Nikkei Asia)

Domestic Luxury Shopping is Here to Stay in China — To the Dismay of Overseas Retailers

The impact of the shop-near-home trend has been noteworthy. According to the Wall Street Journal, the China unit of LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE — owner of Louis Vuitton, LoeweDior, and many others — saw 65% growth year-over-year in the second quarter of 2020, while Kering SA, whose portfolio includes Gucci and Bottega Venetarecorded a 40% increase in revenue in China during the same period. Currently, demand at brick-and-mortar stores is so strong that Gucci and Hermès stores in Shanghai have limited shopper visits to avoid overcrowding. China was virtually the only bright spot for both LVMH and Kering, as global revenue for the two luxury giants in the second quarter of the year plummeted 38% and 43.7%, respectively. Read more (Jing Daily)