Category Archives: archetypes

There is a saying in Japan: “When rules exist, they have to be obeyed.” (Cultural Knowns and Unknowns)

“In Japan, people have an impression that when someone stands out, they will be targeted or bullied,” she said. “So people learn not to stand out, and young people see this as a survival method. Teachers talk about individuality, and yet people’s uniqueness is crushed.” In corporate Japan, that in turn creates an atmosphere in which people are often scared to speak out, particularly in meetings, and especially if they are women, Oshima and Nozu said. Read more (Washington Post)

Mapping Knowns and Unknowns

China’s TikTok Is Banning Users Who Brag About Their Wealth

The purported aim of the ban is to promote “rational spending” and “a civilized lifestyle,” as well as build a healthier community on Douyin, according to the notice. A spokesperson for the platform told media that flaunting wealth “pollutes the social atmosphere (on Douyin) and is particularly harmful for the mental and physical well-being of minors.”

The recently announced cleanup has actually been underway for weeks. Since the start of this year, close to 4,000 accounts that shared content related to the six now-forbidden categories have been given the boot, the statement said. Read more (Sixth Tone)

Teddy Girls: The Style Subculture That Time Forgot

Perhaps more significant than the boy’s subversion of upper-class clothing was the girls’ appropriation of masculine styles. Whilst the pants worn by working women during the war were mostly shed in relief, replaced by the welcome femininity of silhouette-skimming skirts, the Teddy Girls clung to the new sartorial codes that the adoption of menswear for women ushered in: boxy single-breasted jackets and the slicked back quiff hairstyle, a proto-mohawk that would eventually give way to the more extreme hairstyles of punk. Despite their non-conformist style and rebellious attitude, “I never thought of those kids as anything but innocent,” Ken Russell told The Evening Standard. “Even the Teddy Girls [from the 1955 series The Last of the Teddy Girls], all dressed up, were quite edgy, and that interested me; they were more relevant and rebellious — but good as gold. They thought it was fun getting into their clobber, and I thought so too.” Read more

The New Sobriety (2019)

This is according to a new generation of kinda-sorta temporary temperance crusaders, whose attitudes toward the hooch is somewhere between Carrie Nation’s and Carrie Bradshaw’s. To them, sobriety is something less (and more) than a practice relevant only to clinically determined alcohol abusers. Now it can also just be something cool and healthful to try, like going vegan, or taking an Iyengar yoga class. Read more (NY Times)

“Luxury Is That Which You Can Repair”—Why Renewable Fashion’s Time Has Come

The rise of conspicuous non-consumption has been a long time coming. Over the last decade or so, we have witnessed a slow and sometimes painful pivot as fashion at first ignored, then loftily entertained, and finally fell head-over-heels for the concept of “sustainability.” Those who were once dismissed as sackcloth-wearing, soy-munching, Gaia-loving outliers—ideology driven pioneers such as before-her-time Katharine Hamnett, perfectly-timed Stella McCartney, and of-his-time Christopher Raeburn—have proven to be the Cassandras who saw first what most of fashion was too busy making new stuff to realize: As a marker of desirability, being environmentally virtuous has transitioned from niche consideration to central parameter of desire. Read more (Vogue)

Why China’s Millennials Are Targeting These Silicon Valley Brands

Stop me if you’ve come across this type of brand before: It has a contemporary and minimalist feel, tells a story of ethical production and sustainable living, and is based in California’s tech centers. Also known as the “DTC brands,” these West Coast-born lifestyle labels have seen their popularity soar with China’s young and upwardly-mobile consumer class over the past few years. Read more (Jing Daily)

The Young Chinese Men Embracing Nail Art

Whether it be a bold, single-colored coat or a bedazzled optical illusion, fans of nail art know that the tiny canvases of our fingernails can contain a cosmos of possibilities. A beauty routine that is widely practiced by women in China, nail art is starting to gain popularity among young men as well. Read more (Radii China)

Take stock: how photography is secretly shaping our society

Stock photography has long had an image problem. Ranging from the banal to the bizarre, these often cheesy images have aimed to provide a snapshot of everyday life to be used in media, advertising, web design and beyond. However, their prevalence comes great responsibility. As images that are supposed to symbolise everyday life, they tread a tricky tightrope of reflecting the world and imposing on it. Inside the woman-laughing-at-salad trend is a message about what we expect women to beRead more (gal-dem)