Category Archives: cinema

Hollywood has framed getting back to theaters as a content problem. But what we need most is to rethink the design of movie theaters altogether.

Movie theaters are not just giant concrete boxes—a Petco with a projector— but powerful social contracts. Where else do people (generally) agree to put away their phones and (generally) sit in silence for a couple hours other than, perhaps, church? 

https://www.fastcompany.com/90809254/wakanda-forever-cannot-save-movie-theaters-but-this-plan-might

Down with the rich! Class rage fuels new wave of ‘us v them’ films and plays

In the wake of Parasite, the bloody South Korean Oscar-winner, and of the Emmy successes last week for the television dramas Squid Game and White Lotus, which is set in a luxury resort, there is a clear global appetite for exposing and satirising the huge gaps in wealth and status. Both series focused on the desperation of the serving classes.

The ill-fated yacht in Triangle of Sadness is laden with people who represent the moneyed private jet-owners of the modern world. Among them are a grizzled Russian oligarch, who sails alongside both his wife and his mistress, and an elderly British arms manufacturer and his wife. The reluctant captain of the ship is Woody Harrelson, ultimately the accidental agent of destruction in Ruben Östlund’s film. The Swedish director, who is best known for his alpine drama Force Majeure and artworld satire The Square, ultimately hands power over to one of the yacht’s cleaners, Abigail, played by Dolly De Leon, in a storyline that echoes a long history of cautionary tales in which the downtrodden rise up to wreak revenge on their masters.

https://amp-theguardian-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/amp.theguardian.com/film/2022/sep/17/down-with-the-rich-class-rage-fuels-new-wave-of-us-v-them-films-and-plays

Why do we crave the awful futures of apocalyptic fiction?

In the first two decades of the new millennium, stories of the post-apocalypse have permeated pop culture, from books such as Cormac McCarthy’s The Road (2006), Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl (2009) and Emily St John Mandel’s Station Eleven (2014) to films and TV programmes such as The Walking Dead (2010-), the Hunger Games series (2012-15) and Mad Max: Fury Road (2015). While post-apocalyptic fictions of previous eras largely served as cautionary tales – against nuclear brinksmanship in On the Beach (1959) or weaponised biology in The Stand (1978) – today’s versions of these tales depict less alterable, more oblique and diffuse visions of our doom. So why can’t we seem to get enough of humanity’s unavoidable collapse and its bleak aftermath?

https://aeon.co/videos/why-do-we-crave-the-awful-futures-of-apocalyptic-fiction

Artificial intelligence and archive film: how The Light Surgeons put a new spin on Japan’s earliest moving images

Using AI to explore early footage of Japan, Tokinokawa is an ambitious installation merging the antique with the futuristic. From startling discoveries in the rushes to working with ambient pioneer Midori Takada, the creators tell us how it happened.

https://www.bfi.org.uk/interviews/light-surgeons-tokinokawa

What Our Fantasies About the European “Middle Ages” Say About Us

The fantastical imagery that many of us consider “medieval” today has been invented, at least in part, in the centuries since. While some legends are rooted in the period, like the stories of King Arthur and Camelot, many others were embroidered onto an imagined, “medieval-ish” past through fantasy stories, films, and other forms of popular culture, especially from the 19th century on. Modern medieval tales have become populated with knights, dragons, witches, and fairies — though, as the show explains, only the first two were frequently depicted in the period, and anything magical or mysterious was understood through the lens of religion. The exhibition pairs medieval and later imagery to explore these shifting depictions and the powerful legacy they have left.

https://hyperallergic.com/753042/fantasy-of-the-middle-ages-getty-center/?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email

How WALL-E Predicted the Future

The film depicts an Earth rendered uninhabitable by climate change, with the last living humans obese space tourists who communicate solely via video call and rely on meal replacement smoothies for sustenance. There are eerie similarities to much of our current reality, with extreme weather events rising in frequency, obesity rates soaring, Zoom calls taking over our lives, and the rise of meal replacement firms such as Soylent and Huel.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-04-20/pixar-s-wall-e-dystopian-predictions-came-true