Category Archives: education

Can humanity leave nature behind?

In the face of environmental collapse, humanity may need to turn to artificial replacements for nature – how might we avoid the most dystopian of these futures? Researcher Lauren Holt makes the case for a broader form of “offsetting” to help balance technology with natural systems.

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20220608-should-we-detach-ourselves-from-nature

Inside the Rise of “Risky” Playground Design

Educators in Britain are embracing the idea that purposeful risky play promotes resilience and builds more self-reliant young people. As a result, public playspaces there are being redesigned or newly built to actively present that risk. What that looks like—playgrounds with access to saws, knives, loose bricks and two-by-fours, and fire—is something that might sound alarms for some parents here in the litigious U.S.

https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/risky-play-design

First-of-its-kind program invites remote workers to make a home at Purdue University

Work From Purdue, a first-of-its-kind program, invites and incentivizes remote workers to move to Discovery Park District at Purdue, a live/work community that unites the collaborative, invigorating energy of a campus with the flexibility of remote work. From cash stipends to $1,000 dining credit at the Atlas Family Marketplace in the newly renovated Purdue Memorial Union, Work From Purdue’s various relocation packages are designed to support new residents in making the most of their new home from day one.

https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2022/Q2/first-of-its-kind-program-invites-remote-workers-to-make-a-home-at-purdue-university.html

A generation that grew up with Google is forcing professors to rethink their lesson plans

It’s possible that the analogy multiple professors pointed to — filing cabinets — is no longer useful since many students Drossman’s age spent their high school years storing documents in the likes of OneDrive and Dropbox rather than in physical spaces. It could also have to do with the other software they’re accustomed to — dominant smartphone apps like Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, and YouTube all involve pulling content from a vast online sea rather than locating it within a nested hierarchy. “When I want to scroll over to Snapchat, Twitter, they’re not in any particular order, but I know exactly where they are,” says Vogel, who is a devoted iPhone user. Some of it boils down to muscle memory.

https://www.theverge.com/22684730/students-file-folder-directory-structure-education-gen-z

What if your college dorm analyzed your sewage to find out if you’re pregnant or on drugs?

This story is part of Future Tense Fiction, a monthly series of short stories from Future Tense and Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination about how technology and science will change our lives.

https://slate.com/technology/2021/08/beauty-surge-laura-maylene-walter-short-story.html

There is a saying in Japan: “When rules exist, they have to be obeyed.” (Cultural Knowns and Unknowns)

“In Japan, people have an impression that when someone stands out, they will be targeted or bullied,” she said. “So people learn not to stand out, and young people see this as a survival method. Teachers talk about individuality, and yet people’s uniqueness is crushed.” In corporate Japan, that in turn creates an atmosphere in which people are often scared to speak out, particularly in meetings, and especially if they are women, Oshima and Nozu said. Read more (Washington Post)

Mapping Knowns and Unknowns