Category Archives: farming

Future of Work (McKinsey)

The world of work is changing. Artificial intelligence and automation will make this shift as significant as the mechanization in prior generations of agriculture and manufacturing. While some jobs will be lost, and many others created, almost all will change. The COVID-19 crisis accelerated existing trends and caused organizations to reevaluate many aspects of work. This regularly updated collection of articles draws together our latest perspectives on the future of work, workforce, and workplace.

https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work

Imagining Invasive Species Community Kitchens 

“When Henry Hudson arrived in what is now New York City in 1609, there were approximately 350 square miles of oyster reefs in the harbor and its surroundeing waters. These waters contained nearly half of the world’s oyster population — some of which are said to have been, gulp, almost one foot long.”

https://lnkd.in/eQYhPejt

In an article from October 2020, the NY Times reviewed a broader movement to reduce, if not eradicate, invasive species by changing our appetite for them. 

“The theory goes that the more people eat invasive species, the more incentive there is to hunt and harvest them — a classic free-market approach, except that the point is to boost demand until there is no supply. Should diners in fact grow fond of these novelties, the plan could backfire, recasting the species as a valued commodity.”

https://lnkd.in/eAAStEsu

What Happened to Manhattan’s Oyster Barges?
https://lnkd.in/ezdjBWEm

The cost of water risks to business could be more than five times greater than the cost of acting now to address those risks.

Warning bells have increased in just the last few months, with the world’s leading scientists from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change laying out how dramatically the climate crisis is compounding and accelerating the water crisis. A new global assessment identifies the critical sectors and industries – as well as the business activities – most significantly affecting freshwater availability and quality, while another recent analysis underscores the persistent gap in financing to achieve a water secure future. These messages make it clear that key financial players such as institutional investors, banks and development finance institutions urgently need to step up to address the water crisis.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/07/finance-water-crisis?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social_video&utm_term=&utm_content=26480_harvest_water&utm_campaign=social_video_2022

https://www.weforum.org/videos/phantor-producing-drinking-water-from-thin-air

Air Protein creates fake steak from CO2 that replicates taste and texture of meat

While beef generates 70 kilograms of greenhouse gas emissions for every kilogram produced, while also causing widespread deforestation, Air Protein founder Lisa Dyson claims that its protein production emits far less carbon and doesn’t require land or animals.

“We look at the analysis from cradle to gate, prior to when the product is consumed,” she told Dezeen. “On this basis, our vision is to build the first carbon-negative meat company.”

https://www-dezeen-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.dezeen.com/2022/04/14/air-protein-meat-alternative-recycled-carbon-dioxide/amp/

Why We Buy Products Connected to Place, People, and Past

Current marketplace trends suggest that many consumers are seeking products that are local, are manufactured by real people, and traditional or at least remind customers of their childhood.

https://hbr.org/2021/11/why-we-buy-products-connected-to-place-people-and-past

What Nutella Teaches Us About Global Supply Chain Risks

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-11-07/what-nutella-teaches-us-about-global-supply-chain-risks

This is a breakfast staple that, even as it scrambles to keep ever-stricter tabs on supplies, seems to catch a lot of political flak.

Nutella is only one of many reminders that multinational supply chains are at the heart of global struggles like the fight against climate change and the drive to stamp out human-rights abuses. And yet this responsibility still seems to be catching firms by surprise.