Category Archives: food

Belgian organic supermarket chain sells mushrooms grown on its unsold bread

Brussels-based ECLO picks up bread from Bio-Planet stores and mixes it with sawdust to create a growing medium. That substrate is packed into bags and pasteurized, after which mycelium is added and mushrooms start growing. After four to twelve weeks, ECLO harvests organic eryngii and nameko mushrooms, which are then sold at all of Bio-Planet’s stores.

https://www.trendwatching.com/innovation-of-the-day/organic-supermarket-chain-sells-mushrooms-grown-on-its-unsold-bread?utm_campaign=iotd&utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social&utm_term=Bio-Planet%20%C3%97%20ECLO&utm_content=Bio-Planet%20%C3%97%20ECLO

Balenciaga’s next must-have bag? An empty packet of Lays

A couple of months ago, we questioned whether Balenciaga’s next It bag would actually just be… a grab bag of crisps, having spotted Demna sat front row at a graduate fashion show in Antwerp with a packet of Lays perched on his lap or otherwise hooked under his arm as if it were a gorgeous pochette. Cut to the designer’s SS23 show – which took place this morning – and the greasy accessoire was reimagined as a lime-flavoured, calfskin clutch. In Demna’s mind, just about anything can be read as fashion, with the ugliest and most normal of items often engendering the most desire.

https://www.dazeddigital.com/fashion/article/57101/1/balenciaga-it-bag-ss23-lays-crisps-kanye-west-mud-ironic-meme-demna-gvasalia

A robust and standardized framework for reuse measurement is needed. Here’s why

Only 14% of plastic packaging is collected for recycling, with an effective recycling rate of approximately 2% globally. Reusable packaging, designed to be used several times, is necessary to reduce total virgin material consumption, emissions and waste generation by keeping resources in circulation.

Measurement and reporting is a significant barrier to scaling reuse models of consumption. There are currently no standardized and tested metrics to track progress on reuse, which is critical for companies to fully understand the economic, consumer and environmental benefits of reusable business models. Organizations still tend to operate in siloes, using different reuse metrics and calculation methodologies. Standardization of reuse metrics across industry, government and standard-setting institutions will accelerate the systemic shift toward reuse models.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/09/plastic-waste-reuse-measurement?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social_scheduler&utm_term=SDIM2022&utm_content=26/09/2022+00:00

Mushrooms Are Popping Up in Our Cocktails

Recently, bartenders and drink professionals across the U.S. have started using mushrooms to add rich, savory flavors to cocktails made with and without alcohol. Some highlight the sweet taste of candy cap mushrooms in their drinks. Others prefer the smooth, deep flavor of creminis. With more than 10,000 varieties to choose from, mushrooms’ drinks potential is vast.

“As cocktail culture continues to progress I think that more and more people are looking for something creative and unexpected. Something they haven’t seen before or tasted in a cocktail,” says Nathan McCullough, the bar director at The Wolves DTLA.

https://www-thrillist-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.thrillist.com/amphtml/drink/nation/mushroom-cocktails-bring-unexpected-flavors-to-happy-hour

Does the shift to a circular economy have a simple solution?

Hundreds of millions of tonnes of waste end up in landfills yearly – actual wastelands of everything from mattresses to electrical equipment to unworn clothes, determined to be worthless and no longer needed.

Extending the value of such things and the materials they’re made of will lessen our reliance on extraction – raw material extraction – something our current economy is pretty good at and which translates into high sales-related profits. This shift would stem the environmental impacts of extraction, such as polluting waste streams and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

“Using things longer” isn’t as simple as it sounds and understanding how to maximize the value of a product and its materials “post-consumer” is critical for a circular economy to work.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/09/using-stuff-longer-does-the-shift-to-a-circular-economy-have-a-simple-solution

Imagining Invasive Species Community Kitchens 

“When Henry Hudson arrived in what is now New York City in 1609, there were approximately 350 square miles of oyster reefs in the harbor and its surroundeing waters. These waters contained nearly half of the world’s oyster population — some of which are said to have been, gulp, almost one foot long.”

https://lnkd.in/eQYhPejt

In an article from October 2020, the NY Times reviewed a broader movement to reduce, if not eradicate, invasive species by changing our appetite for them. 

“The theory goes that the more people eat invasive species, the more incentive there is to hunt and harvest them — a classic free-market approach, except that the point is to boost demand until there is no supply. Should diners in fact grow fond of these novelties, the plan could backfire, recasting the species as a valued commodity.”

https://lnkd.in/eAAStEsu

What Happened to Manhattan’s Oyster Barges?
https://lnkd.in/ezdjBWEm

The Burger That Instagram Built

The approach to getting them in the door, however, has borrowed from music industry tactics rather than conventional food-industry wisdom. Three of the working founders — Nic Adler, Bill Fold and Ms. Jiaras — have connections to Goldenvoice, the concert and festival conglomerate that operates Coachella.

https://www-nytimes-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.nytimes.com/2022/06/25/style/montys-good-burger.amp.html