Category Archives: forecasting

IDSA Idea Gallery

This collection holds over 3,000 past Gold, Silver and Bronze winners, as well as Featured Finalists. It stands as an everlasting celebration of brilliance and is a comprehensive reference tool for designers around the world. The winners within this collection are responsible for billions of dollars in sales, have saved lives and have forever changed how people live, work and play. Apple’s original iPhone (Gold, 2008), Tesla’s Model S (Gold, 2013) and the Oculus Rift (Bronze, 2016) are just three recent examples of IDEA winners that have completely disrupted industry and society. This gallery displays the tremendous significance design has in business and beyond. Proving that great results can happen when design is leveraged to its fullest power.

https://www.idsa.org/IDEAgallery?combine=&term_node_tid_depth=383&field_year_value=All&field_idea_award_level_value=All&field_award_special_value=All

What It Will Take to Inspire Hope for a Better Tomorrow

FUTURESthe Smithsonian’s first major building-wide exploration of what lies ahead, sought to address this gap. For eight months between November and July 2022, more than 650,000 people immersed themselves in the exhibition’s 32,000-square feet packed with groundbreaking ideas, contemporary art commissions, prototypes, immersive experiences and historic objects—all, explicitly, focusing on hopeful solutions to navigate the world to come.

First, and perhaps most powerful: Hope drives action. We know that awareness of a problem in and of itself doesn’t often lead to change. When faced with huge challenges like climate change and social division, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed and powerless. And yet today common wisdom seems to be that that you have to scare people into taking action on a particular issue or problem. You need to focus on what could go wrong, the disastrous implications and dire consequences that might happen if we are not sufficiently vigilant or motivated.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/what-it-will-take-to-inspire-hope-for-a-better-tomorrow-180980751/

Future of offices: in a post-pandemic world (Arup)

COVID-19 has accelerated a range of preexisting trends in the commercial property sector around health and wellbeing, activitybased working, flexibility and the drive for better space utilisation. Sustainability, smart buildings and the digital workplace are also reshaping the commercial offer. Taken together, these trends and developments will profoundly impact the kinds of workplaces likely to be needed in a post-pandemic world. 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EFDdzGO4DuEu459kr1PFwN_exVZiZHiv/view?usp=sharing

Future of Work (McKinsey)

The world of work is changing. Artificial intelligence and automation will make this shift as significant as the mechanization in prior generations of agriculture and manufacturing. While some jobs will be lost, and many others created, almost all will change. The COVID-19 crisis accelerated existing trends and caused organizations to reevaluate many aspects of work. This regularly updated collection of articles draws together our latest perspectives on the future of work, workforce, and workplace.

https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work

All you need to know about global economics right now, according to the IMF

Authors from Cambridge economist Diane Coyle to Bank of Japan veteran Masaaki Shirakawa have provided more than enough reason to put down our phones and concentrate, as much as one can, on absorbing the larger lessons from leading thinkers. A selection of volumes worth picking up, drawn from books recently reviewed in the IMF’s Finance & Development magazine.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/09/economics-books-must-reads-imf?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social_scheduler&utm_term=Economic+Progress&utm_content=10/09/2022+11:00

Why ‘longtermism’ isn’t ethically sound

Longtermism relies on the theory that humans have evolved fairly recently, and thus we can expect our species to grow long into the future. The world’s current population is really a blip; if all goes well, a huge number of humans will come after us. Thus, if we’re reasoning rationally and impartially (as EAs pride themselves on doing), we should tilt heavily toward paying attention to this larger future population’s concerns — not the concerns of people living right now.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/09/05/longtermism-philanthropy-altruism-risks/

Does the shift to a circular economy have a simple solution?

Hundreds of millions of tonnes of waste end up in landfills yearly – actual wastelands of everything from mattresses to electrical equipment to unworn clothes, determined to be worthless and no longer needed.

Extending the value of such things and the materials they’re made of will lessen our reliance on extraction – raw material extraction – something our current economy is pretty good at and which translates into high sales-related profits. This shift would stem the environmental impacts of extraction, such as polluting waste streams and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

“Using things longer” isn’t as simple as it sounds and understanding how to maximize the value of a product and its materials “post-consumer” is critical for a circular economy to work.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/09/using-stuff-longer-does-the-shift-to-a-circular-economy-have-a-simple-solution

Imagining Invasive Species Community Kitchens 

“When Henry Hudson arrived in what is now New York City in 1609, there were approximately 350 square miles of oyster reefs in the harbor and its surroundeing waters. These waters contained nearly half of the world’s oyster population — some of which are said to have been, gulp, almost one foot long.”

https://lnkd.in/eQYhPejt

In an article from October 2020, the NY Times reviewed a broader movement to reduce, if not eradicate, invasive species by changing our appetite for them. 

“The theory goes that the more people eat invasive species, the more incentive there is to hunt and harvest them — a classic free-market approach, except that the point is to boost demand until there is no supply. Should diners in fact grow fond of these novelties, the plan could backfire, recasting the species as a valued commodity.”

https://lnkd.in/eAAStEsu

What Happened to Manhattan’s Oyster Barges?
https://lnkd.in/ezdjBWEm