Category Archives: music

Grimes says anyone can use her voice for AI-generated songs

Grimes isn’t the first artist to embrace voice cloning and artificial intelligence tools. Holly Herndon, an experimental musician, introduced her own artificial voice called Holly Plus in 2021. Herndon allows users to upload audio files and receive a new version sung in her voice. Only members of Herndon’s decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) are able to profit from the voice model.

https://www.theverge.com/2023/4/24/23695746/grimes-ai-music-profit-sharing-copyright-ip

Grimes says anyone can use her voice for AI-generated songs

Grimes isn’t the first artist to embrace voice cloning and artificial intelligence tools. Holly Herndon, an experimental musician, introduced her own artificial voice called Holly Plus in 2021. Herndon allows users to upload audio files and receive a new version sung in her voice. Only members of Herndon’s decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) are able to profit from the voice model.

https://www.theverge.com/2023/4/24/23695746/grimes-ai-music-profit-sharing-copyright-ip

The treachery of images in the age of AI

“Reality certainly appears to be cracking [under] the speed of generative AI expansion,” says Tim Stock, an associate teaching professor at Parsons School of Design, and founder of scenarioDNA, a consultancy that uses AI to map cultural trends. “We are engineering our future with very little attention to the cultural and sociological impact that might have.” To some extent, he adds, Nugent is contributing to this sense of confusion with his “idealised expression[s] of our collective imagination”

https://www.dazeddigital.com/art-photography/article/59695/1/the-treachery-of-images-in-the-age-of-artificial-intelligence-luke-nugent

After Fake Drake Debacle, Expect More AI Songs. But Are They Legal? 

It’s unclear whether only the soundalike vocals were created with AI tools – a common trick used for years in internet parody videos and deepfakes – or if the entire song was created solely by a machine based purely on a prompt to create a Drake track, a more novel and potentially disruptive development. 

For an industry already on edge about the sudden growth of artificial intelligence, the appearance of a song that convincingly replicated the work product of two of music’s biggest stars and one of its top producers and won over likely millions of listeners has set off serious alarm bells.

https://www.billboard.com/pro/drake-the-weeknd-fake-song-ai-generated-music-illegal/

We soon won’t tell the difference between AI and human music – so can pop survive? (The Guardian)

ChatGPT Is Knock Knock Knockin’ on Spotify’s Door

If music AI’s Turing Test is good taste, the Blake-Endel album doesn’t pass mine. I prefer soundscapes that are a little less chilled. But I’m not Endel’s target audience. “Functional” music — whale song, white noise, anything designed to play in the background — garners 10 billion streams per month, Stavitsky says, double last year’s total and contributing between 7% to 10% of the entire streaming market. Real humans are listening to the machines: Endel says it gets more than 2 million monthly listeners across all streaming platforms, has struck a playlist partnership with Amazon.com Inc. and released an “AI Lullaby” with Canadian electronica artist Grimes.

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2023-04-14/chatgpt-ai-is-knock-knock-knockin-on-spotify-s-door

Digital Fashion Unlocks Lucrative Revenue Streams For Musicians & Celebrities

According to Warner Music Group’s Chief Digital Officer & EVP, Business Development, Oana Ruxandra, “The representation of our future digital selves will be as important and, if you’re measuring by sheer volume of interactions, maybe more important than how we represent ourselves physically.”

https://www-forbes-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.forbes.com/sites/stephaniehirschmiller/2022/12/16/warner-music-group-partners-with-dressx-digital-fashion/amp/

Humans need to dance together more than ever

The demise of clubbing isn’t just a cultural loss, it’s an existential deprivation for generations who are coming of age.

In 2006, there were reckoned to be 3,000 nightclubs in the UK. By the end of 2019 there were less than half that number, and late last year, the figure was put at only 1,068. The reasons for this decline are partly about what has happened to our cities, and the mindset of many of the people who run them: a story of rising rents, authoritarian councils, and the kind of gentrification that involves people moving into bustling urban locations and then having the brass neck to complain about the noise. Of late, clubs’ finances have been made even more impossible by the effects of the pandemic, and colossal rises in running costs. But whereas last week’s budget saw Jeremy Hunt announcing a freeze in beer duty that he called the “Brexit pubs guarantee”, the fate of clubs is not something politicians really talk about.

https://amp-theguardian-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/amp.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/mar/19/isolated-humans-dance-together-demise-clubbing

Music and the Future

An interesting article in Mixmag asks the question: Why does it seem like dance music has gotten so hard and fast recently? This question is a window into cultural intelligence. https://lnkd.in/eWx_A3R2

The clues music provides are more than just what is explicit in the sound and visible traits of behavior – it is also in how those things demonstrate a pattern of change – a dynamic that reveals broader cultural codes.

Music is foundational to how I think about foresight within my own experience as shaped by being a small part of what was the nascent Detroit Techno movement in the early 1980s. Understanding how musical genres migrate and multiply is a crash course in the impact of subcultures as engines of social innovation. 

To understand Detroit Techno (https://lnkd.in/eHQkXVCX) you need to understand how Detroit was uniquely positioned to cultivate the cultural movement. From the evolving hardcore punk scene (https://lnkd.in/g2QH2g6a) to the Electrifyin’ Mojo on WGPR (https://lnkd.in/exmzsTZC) to the new European sounds seeping in through Canadian College radio. Sounds only available as import records at the time and not played on mainstream radio (https://lnkd.in/ezMvsFAd). That hothouse of creativity had a unique linguistic potential. 

To understand how these movements evolve and multiply we can analyze the language. By language, I mean everything used to make meaning of that movement distinct — its closest influences, its instruments, its machines (https://lnkd.in/ePGMGmc8) and its musicians all the way to the words that are used to describe it in the fanzines (https://lnkd.in/eVXi9WkJ). Music is an expression of the externalities of cultural change. Music is telling us more about the condition we are not able to express verbally and also what is about to happen next.

#musicians#creativity#innovation#language#intelligence#culturemapping#foresight#speculativedesign#music#generativeai#chatgpt

Has Luxury Outgrown Fashion?

Reactions to the brand’s move to appoint a non-designer as men’s creative director were mixed. But cultural strategies that stretch beyond fashion may be increasingly important to brands at Vuitton’s scale.

https://www.businessoffashion.com/briefings/luxury/pharrell-at-louis-vuitton-has-luxury-outgrown-fashion/?utm_source=newsletter_professional_thisweek&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=This_Week_In_Fashion_170223&utm_term=MU2LIQXOPRA5FNQEHOG24W2SXU&utm_content=top_story_title

Rick Rubin in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell (podcast)

Today the interviewer becomes the interviewee. In his nearly 40-year career as a producer, Rick Rubin has helped unlock creativity and inspire musical genius time and time again. The artists he’s worked with often say that one of Rick’s superpowers is his expert ability to listen deeply, and to help guide whoever he’s working with to find their deepest expression of truth.

This month Rick released his first book, called The Creative Act: A Way Of Being. In it he shares practical principles on how anyone can generate creative authenticity and ultimately find their voice.

On today’s episode Malcolm Gladwell talks to Rick about The Creative Act, and they explore the principles in the book that are applicable to feelings of stagnation beyond artistic life. Rick talks about why he believes creativity comes from external forces rather than internal ones, and he explains why he believes that self expression isn’t actually about you.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rick-rubin-in-conversation-with-malcolm-gladwell/id1311004083?i=1000594389354