Category Archives: social media

Discord: The Server as Community

Discord users create their own ‘servers,’ which are chat rooms enabling collaborations over mutually interesting topics of any kind: teachers setting up classrooms, politicians organizing campaign meetings or artists discussing their work. Today, many fashion and luxury brands invest in Discord as a space where culture, entertainment and gaming collide. It’s a place where brands can give communities incentives to co-create and sometimes own a piece of the brand, product or service.

https://medium.com/frog-voices/discord-the-server-as-community-7a958c8ba67c

Why Do We Love TikTok Audio Memes? Call It‘ Brainfeel.’

Welcome to the era of the audio meme, a time when replicable units of sound are a cultural currency as strong as — if not stronger than — images and text. Though TikTok didn’t invent the audio meme, its effortless interface may have perfected it, and the platform, which recently ended Google’s 15-year-long run as the most visited website in the world, would be nothing without sound.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2022/08/17/magazine/tiktok-sounds-memes.html

Forever young, beautiful and scandal-free: The rise of South Korea’s virtual influencers

Sometimes, Sidus Studio X creates an image of Rozy from head to toe using the technology, an approach that works well for her Instagram images. Other times it superimposes her head onto the body of a human model — when she models clothing, for instance.

https://www-cnn-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.cnn.com/style/amp/south-korea-virtual-influencers-beauty-social-media-intl-hnk-dst/index.html

FBI Says People Are Using Deepfakes to Apply to Remote Jobs

According to the FBI’s announcement, more companies have been reporting people applying to jobs using video, images, or recordings that are manipulated to look and sound like somebody else. These fakers are also using personal identifiable information from other people—stolen identities—to apply to jobs at IT, programming, database, and software firms. The report noted that many of these open positions had access to sensitive customer or employee data, as well as financial and proprietary company info, implying the imposters could have a desire to steal sensitive information as well as a bent to cash a fraudulent paycheck.

https://gizmodo-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/gizmodo.com/deepfakes-remote-work-job-applications-fbi-1849118604/amp

The Burger That Instagram Built

The approach to getting them in the door, however, has borrowed from music industry tactics rather than conventional food-industry wisdom. Three of the working founders — Nic Adler, Bill Fold and Ms. Jiaras — have connections to Goldenvoice, the concert and festival conglomerate that operates Coachella.

https://www-nytimes-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.nytimes.com/2022/06/25/style/montys-good-burger.amp.html

CHINA’S BODY-POSITIVE INFLUENCERS

An growing number of Chinese influencers have had it with the distorted, filtered images coming at them from every pixel on their super-app screen. From WeChat to Douyin and Weibo, they refuse to conform to social media’s perception of the perfect body.

https://chinatemper.com/chinese-society/body-positive-influencers

Will China embrace plus-size fashion?

https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/fashion-beauty/article/2181068/will-china-embrace-plus-size-fashion-only-if-women-stop

Influencer Scarlett Hao On The Chinese Body Image And Body Positivity

How should Twitter Change? (New Yorker)

Ai is right to compare Twitter to the weather. Although tweets are written in words, Twitter is also shaped by constantly flowing nonverbal currents. Algorithms determine who sees tweets and how fast and far they propagate; a system of likes, follows, and retweets structures our responses to what others say; millions of bots chatter into the ether and follow accounts, gaming the system and shaping our discourse.

https://www.newyorker.com/newsletter/the-daily/how-should-twitter-change?utm_source=nl&utm_brand=tny&utm_mailing=TNY_Daily_Test_CMUnit_051322&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_medium=email&utm_term=tny_daily_digest&bxid=5bd66dd12ddf9c6194382970&cndid=13267906&hasha=9daa350d41aff482ef70345758ade9d6&hashb=8d9dbc2d50718e70c553f3060d24988afeba31d7&hashc=305e7b751cd4cde167a93ee9770cfcfff72a85daf86fa885c4acc7e91ba511d1&esrc=AUTO_PRINT&mbid=CRMNYR012019

Gen Z Has a Fast Fashion Problem. That’s Bad for the Climate and Equity

A 2020 survey by Vogue Business found that more than half of its Gen Z participants bought most of their clothes from fast-fashion brands, like H&M, Gap, Zara and Forever 21. Market research firm Mintel has reported that Gen Z, generally seen as those born between 1997 and 2010, also buys more clothes than older generations, with the average Gen-Zer owning hundreds of dollars worth of outfits that never get worn at all. It’s a trend that analysts say is fueled by a social media culture that pressures youth and young adults to never wear the same outfit twice, as well as an industry that has made impulse buying and returning items far easier.

https://insideclimatenews.org/todaysclimate/gen-z-has-a-fast-fashion-problem-thats-bad-for-the-climate-and-equity/