Category Archives: work

UN calls for moratorium on AI that threatens human rights

AI’s abilities to conduct profiling and automate decision-making – as well as its other uses – threaten myriad human rights. It can affect the “rights to health, education, freedom of movement, freedom of peaceful assembly and association, and freedom of expression,” the UN human rights office warned.

https://www.aljazeera.com/economy/2021/9/15/warning-of-risk-un-rights-chief-urges-ai-oversight-regulation

What if your college dorm analyzed your sewage to find out if you’re pregnant or on drugs?

This story is part of Future Tense Fiction, a monthly series of short stories from Future Tense and Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination about how technology and science will change our lives.

https://slate.com/technology/2021/08/beauty-surge-laura-maylene-walter-short-story.html

Work in the Pandemic Age

We use applied semiotics and cultural anthropology to understand how meaning is changing. This report applies the method to working in the Pandemic Age, framing the trends we are seeing into meaning spaces that fuel better service design. For too long, workplace decision makers have turned a blind eye to dysfunctional behavior. Now, COVID-19 has pushed work beyond its breaking point. Our analysis offers a path forward. https://bit.ly/workinthepademicage

The Googleplex of the Future Has Privacy Robots, Meeting Tents and Your Very Own Balloon Wall

In 2018, Google’s real estate group began to consider what it could do differently. It turned to the company’s research and development team for “built environments.” It was an eclectic group of architects, industrial and interior designers, structural engineers, builders and tech specialists led by Michelle Kaufmann, who worked with the renowned architect Frank Gehry before joining Google a decade ago.

Google focused on three trends: Work happens anywhere and not just in the office; what employees need from a workplace is changing constantly; and workplaces need to be more than desks, meeting rooms and amenities.

“The future of work that we thought was 10 years out,” Ms. Kaufmann said, “Covid brought us to that future now.” Read more (NY Times)