Category Archives: kitchen

Unilever’s latest laundry capsule is made from CO2 taken from a Chinese steel mill.

The laundry capsules, available through the brand Omo and launching in China April 22, result from a partnership between Unilever, biotech company LanzaTech, and green chemical company India Glycols. LanzaTech, which has a commercial plant running in China that turns carbon emissions from a steel mill into ethanol, has already used its carbon recycling process to turn those emissions into jet fuel and alcohol for fragrances. Read more (Fast Company)

is Deliveroo killing restaurant culture?

“In a world where consumers want more, better and faster, we think Deliveroo is doing a good job,” concluded a report by the private investment bank Berenberg earlier this month. Plenty of people who make money from money are betting that Deliveroo is on a long-term path to profitability, even if its current set-up pushes the company further into the red with every order. “We truly believe we are still getting started,” declared Deliveroo’s founder, Will Shu, in a letter to prospective shareholders. “Join us on the journey.” But what is that journey’s ultimate destination? And what will the implications be – for the way we eat, the livelihoods of those who feed us and the future of our neighbourhoods – once we arrive? Read more (The Guardian)

Why Grocery Shopping Is on Its Way Out

The way Canadians get their food is changing. Our grocery industry—which currently employs over 300,000 people and is valued at $97.5 ­billion according to Canadian Grocer—is in an arms race to modernize for a digital era. More and more customers expect the convenience of needing to think far less about their groceries, and work less to get them, than they ever have before. What’s less clear is the ripple effects this will have on our daily lives, our communities, our health, and our workforces. Read more (TheWalrus.ca)

All I Want To Do Is Look At Ugly Food Photos

As someone who was deeply invested in the era of peak food-blogging in the mid- to late-aughts, I have, in the past, enjoyed many an artful photo of moist cake slices or runny-yolked eggs. Styling these images to pop on Tumblr or Instagram takes real, undeniable skill. But, it’s only recently that I’ve realized that I have moved beyond those specific visual pleasures. After nearly two decades as a social media user, I’ve grown tired of how images, specifically of food, are often presented — that is, perfectly.  Read more (Refinery29)

How Ikea created a ‘ScrapsBook’ that turns kitchen waste into culinary wonders

“By inspiring our customers to live more sustainably at home in an easy and simple way, we’re doing our part as a business to have a positive impact, from our supply chain through our retail stores, and into our customers’ homes,” explains Johanna Andren, head of marketing for IKEA Canada. Read more (Drum)

Biff’s Launches “World’s First” Vegan Junk Food Tasting Menu, Sells Out in 48 Hours

Launched in collaboration with Restaurant Kits, the founders of Biff’s describe the concept as “naughty cuisine meets haute cuisine mash up, this filthy ‘fine dining’ experience takes gourmands on a journey through vegan indulgence, moving between comfort food classics from Biff’s legendary fryers, to plant-based, takes on some street food favourites.” Read more (vegconomist)

How Did Our Fridges Get So Big?

The pandemic and the lockdowns have changed the way many people use their kitchens, and designers are rethinking them as well. I have noted in a previous post on design trends that people are cooking more, and that preparing food has become more of a family affair, so I have been forced to reconsider my case for closed, rather than open kitchens. Read more (Tree Hugger)