Category Archives: society

The Return of Stealth Wealth

To American ears, this approach might sound callous. But according to Morris-Glennon, the British class system has a staggering influence on the country’s work attire. What you wear offers insight into where you are in life and where you used to be. As Morris-Glennon puts it, “In England especially, the more money you have, the less you care about clothing. The old money sometimes, you wouldn’t be able to pull them out of a crowd.” She narrows her eyes and says slowly, “The last person you’d think was a billionaire is the billionaire.”

https://www.vogue.com/article/industry-hbo-style-fashion

Sinead O’Dwyer On Why Body-Diverse Casting Needs To Become The Norm At Fashion Week

London-based Irish designer Sinead O’Dwyer has made it her mission to promote body diversity – from casting to the clothing she puts into production. Still on a high after showing her spring/summer 2023 collection at London Fashion Week, on a cast of models from size 8 to 26, O’Dwyer says it’s “only going to get better” from here. Here, she shares the steps she’s taken to prioritise inclusivity – and to encourage others in the industry to do the same.

https://www-vogue-co-uk.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.vogue.co.uk/fashion/article/sinead-odwyer-body-diversity/amp

Analyzing Hybrid Work

I have been getting students in my Fall Analyzing Trends class at Parsons School of Design – The New School up to speed in mapping speculative past/futures over the last few weeks. We started off by looking at the topic of hybrid work that has been in the news so much of late. As companies begin to put a stake in the ground on where they might sit in designing the meaning of work.

The archetypal extremes of “everyone back” (Tesla) to “work anywhere” (Airbnb) frameworks have been getting the most attention as to where work and the office might be going next. From the evolving design of offices from open plans to the emerging new types of privacy needs, to the ways technology and human skills begin to overlap and hint at possible emerging unknowns that will impact education, skills, and sustainable investment. #work#foresight#speculativedesign#mural#midjourney

Does Dalle think it makes more sense that men should drive than women?

Here is a quick study into the narrative tropes within AI and some interesting work for semiotics. Apparently, #Dalle thinks it makes more sense that men should drive than women. In a simple experiment using an image of my daughter taking me for a drive to generate variations (the last image in this series) – in all instances, #Dalle switched the man to the driver’s seat. Even imparting imagined active gestures for the male and passive gestures for the female in the image. #ai #bias #tropes #gesture #semiotics

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6978117340840259584/?commentUrn=urn%3Ali%3Acomment%3A(activity%3A6978117340840259584%2C6978839553402912769)&dashCommentUrn=urn%3Ali%3Afsd_comment%3A(6978839553402912769%2Curn%3Ali%3Aactivity%3A6978117340840259584)

The Metaphysical War For The Metaverse We’re Already Losing

Virtual worlds should be as much of an expression of the people designing and living in them as possible. With the creator tools we already have and semi-open platforms like Roblox or Minecraft we can build pretty much anything within them. You could argue that even Minecraft obeys a little too much to the laws of the physical world but it wasn’t built as a metaverse platform so you can forgive it a little.

https://medium.com/@theo/the-metaphysical-war-for-the-metaverse-were-already-losing-ba576339a3e2

The Gamification of Humanity

When did daily life come to feel so much like a competition? In “You’ve Been Played,” Adrian Hon traces how and why gamification — the application of video-game principles like experience points, streaks, leader boards, badges and special challenges — has come to suffuse nearly every aspect of human existence in the digital era. Examples range from exercise (Nike, Strava), housework (Chore Wars) and brushing your teeth (Pokémon Smile), to — more disturbingly — going to school (ClassDojo) or work (Amazon warehouses’ PicksInSpace).

Hon slips easily between the perspectives of expert, enthusiast and critic. An education in neuroscience informs his explanation of the behaviorist underpinnings of gamification. And in his capacity leading the games company behind the popular running app Zombies, Run!, much of his working life is spent tussling with these issues. Some of the book’s most insightful moments come when Hon discusses how his team considers ethics and user experience when deciding how much to use gamification tricks in their own work.

https://www-nytimes-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.nytimes.com/2022/09/20/books/review/youve-been-played-adrian-hon.amp.html