Category Archives: society

CHINA’S BODY-POSITIVE INFLUENCERS

An growing number of Chinese influencers have had it with the distorted, filtered images coming at them from every pixel on their super-app screen. From WeChat to Douyin and Weibo, they refuse to conform to social media’s perception of the perfect body.

https://chinatemper.com/chinese-society/body-positive-influencers

Will China embrace plus-size fashion?

https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/fashion-beauty/article/2181068/will-china-embrace-plus-size-fashion-only-if-women-stop

Influencer Scarlett Hao On The Chinese Body Image And Body Positivity

What Nietzsche can teach us about embracing risk and failure in an age of technological comforts

Safety through technology is certainly not a bad thing. But the need for safety can become pathological. Friedrich Nietzsche’s basic premise is that failure is an option. It is woven tightly into a life worth living. It is time for a personal inventory: Which of our devices and practices enable a life that experiences the world in ways and places not always engineered for our comfort?

https://bigthink.com/thinking/nietzsche-failure-comfort/

How should Twitter Change? (New Yorker)

Ai is right to compare Twitter to the weather. Although tweets are written in words, Twitter is also shaped by constantly flowing nonverbal currents. Algorithms determine who sees tweets and how fast and far they propagate; a system of likes, follows, and retweets structures our responses to what others say; millions of bots chatter into the ether and follow accounts, gaming the system and shaping our discourse.

https://www.newyorker.com/newsletter/the-daily/how-should-twitter-change?utm_source=nl&utm_brand=tny&utm_mailing=TNY_Daily_Test_CMUnit_051322&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_medium=email&utm_term=tny_daily_digest&bxid=5bd66dd12ddf9c6194382970&cndid=13267906&hasha=9daa350d41aff482ef70345758ade9d6&hashb=8d9dbc2d50718e70c553f3060d24988afeba31d7&hashc=305e7b751cd4cde167a93ee9770cfcfff72a85daf86fa885c4acc7e91ba511d1&esrc=AUTO_PRINT&mbid=CRMNYR012019

Gen Z Has a Fast Fashion Problem. That’s Bad for the Climate and Equity

A 2020 survey by Vogue Business found that more than half of its Gen Z participants bought most of their clothes from fast-fashion brands, like H&M, Gap, Zara and Forever 21. Market research firm Mintel has reported that Gen Z, generally seen as those born between 1997 and 2010, also buys more clothes than older generations, with the average Gen-Zer owning hundreds of dollars worth of outfits that never get worn at all. It’s a trend that analysts say is fueled by a social media culture that pressures youth and young adults to never wear the same outfit twice, as well as an industry that has made impulse buying and returning items far easier.

https://insideclimatenews.org/todaysclimate/gen-z-has-a-fast-fashion-problem-thats-bad-for-the-climate-and-equity/

Elon Musk, Twitter and the Attention Economy

Twitter has about 229 million monetizable daily active users, the vast majority of whom live outside of the United States. Twitter said that its first quarter growth and increased usage was largely “due to the war in Ukraine as people turned to Twitter to organize, share news, find sources of support and stay connected.” In an attention economy, much of our value as consumers is measured by the time we spend on the site — liking memes, signal boosting information, clicking on links. During times of crisis and fast-moving world events, it’s an invaluable resource.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-05-04/elon-musk-twitter-and-the-attention-economy

This Man Married a Fictional Character. He’d Like You to Hear Him Out.

Mr. Kondo is one of thousands of people in Japan who have entered into unofficial marriages with fictional characters in recent decades, served by a vast industry aimed at satisfying the every whim of a fervent fan culture. Tens of thousands more around the globe have joined online groups where they discuss their commitment to characters from anime, manga and video games.

How WALL-E Predicted the Future

The film depicts an Earth rendered uninhabitable by climate change, with the last living humans obese space tourists who communicate solely via video call and rely on meal replacement smoothies for sustenance. There are eerie similarities to much of our current reality, with extreme weather events rising in frequency, obesity rates soaring, Zoom calls taking over our lives, and the rise of meal replacement firms such as Soylent and Huel.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-04-20/pixar-s-wall-e-dystopian-predictions-came-true

The new status signaling is no status signaling at all.

“Luxury brands have taken note that consumers want to be more mindful of what they wear and how they express themselves, especially as the pandemic has caused economic hardship for so many,” says Hannah Watkins, head of printsand graphics at trend-forecasting agency WGSN. She explains that many consumers are looking to live more sustainable lives, an aspect of which may be about buying less. “Opting for a more minimalist approach to branding will also enhance an item’s longevity and cost per wear,” she adds.

https://www.ellecanada.com/fashion/trends/is-being-understated-the-newest-fashion-trend