Category Archives: fashion

The hidden meanings behind fashion’s most dramatic colour

Through history, wearing black has signified power, rebellion, death, sex and more. Deborah Nicholls-Lee explores the inky depths of fashion’s most timeless colour – and how Cristóbal Balenciaga made it iconic.

https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20221003-the-hidden-meanings-behind-fashions-most-dramatic-colour?

The colour is also a symbol of subversion. Subcultures such as rockers, punks and goths donned black to rebel against social conventions, playing their “youthful vivacity”, says Harvey, against sombre and sinister clothing choices. But popular culture also sees black associated with protest. When A-listers showed their support for the anti-sexual harassment movement Time’s Up at the Golden Globes in 2018, it was black they elected to wear.

Balenciaga’s next must-have bag? An empty packet of Lays

A couple of months ago, we questioned whether Balenciaga’s next It bag would actually just be… a grab bag of crisps, having spotted Demna sat front row at a graduate fashion show in Antwerp with a packet of Lays perched on his lap or otherwise hooked under his arm as if it were a gorgeous pochette. Cut to the designer’s SS23 show – which took place this morning – and the greasy accessoire was reimagined as a lime-flavoured, calfskin clutch. In Demna’s mind, just about anything can be read as fashion, with the ugliest and most normal of items often engendering the most desire.

https://www.dazeddigital.com/fashion/article/57101/1/balenciaga-it-bag-ss23-lays-crisps-kanye-west-mud-ironic-meme-demna-gvasalia

How ‘Dupe’ Culture Took Over Online Fashion

TikTok has sped up fashion cycles — and helped push inexpensive knockoffs onto the market in record time


https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-features/dupe-culture-fast-fashion-tiktok-1234591964/ (Rolling Stone/paywall)

Inside TikTok’s Controversial Dupe Culture (Byrdie)

The case against dupe culture (QJ)

https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?geo=US&q=duped

Nest Fosters Upcycling in Artisan and Fashion Production

While the industry pivots toward sustainability, innovative solutions beyond upcycled designs are emerging to combat its environmental impacts. In addition to supporting upcycling collaborations, Nest is launching a more scalable solution with Queen of Raw, a digital platform for buying and selling deadstock fabric. In response to the vast amounts of excess fabric reported to be sitting in warehouses around the world (worth more than $120 billion USD), the founders launched an online marketplace where brands can offload these materials and anyone from makers to small brands can purchase them at a reduced price. The intent is to prevent these textiles from being burned, buried, shredded or otherwise destroyed by enabling them to be upcycled into other products.

https://www.buildanest.org/nest-fosters-upcycling-in-artisan-and-fashion-production/

The Return of Stealth Wealth

To American ears, this approach might sound callous. But according to Morris-Glennon, the British class system has a staggering influence on the country’s work attire. What you wear offers insight into where you are in life and where you used to be. As Morris-Glennon puts it, “In England especially, the more money you have, the less you care about clothing. The old money sometimes, you wouldn’t be able to pull them out of a crowd.” She narrows her eyes and says slowly, “The last person you’d think was a billionaire is the billionaire.”

https://www.vogue.com/article/industry-hbo-style-fashion

A Hotline Garment Workers Can Call When They Face Harassment on the Job

In an industry that has long been largely allowed to police itself, these hotlines are part of a greater movement toward accountability for brands and factories. But even their supporters are quick to point out that they are not a cure-all. Many of the conditions that make gender-based violence hard to stamp out in the world at large — like stigma and victim-blaming — exist in factories too. And in an industry beholden to the frenzied pace and dizzyingly low prices of fast fashion, working conditions remain difficult to regulate. 

https://inthesetimes.com/article/lesotho-women-workers-labor-unions-hotline

https://www.workersrights.org/

Fast fashion: European Union reveals fast fashion crackdown

For every person in the EU, textile consumption requires nine cubic metres of water, 400 square metres of land, 391kg of raw materials, and causes a carbon footprint of about 270kg.

In the UK, politicians have called on the government to change the law to require fashion retailers to comply with environmental standards.

The government rejected most of the Environmental Audit Committee’s recommendations in 2019, including making clothes producers pay for better clothing collection and recycling, but has made textile waste a priority.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-60913226